Friday, December 16, 2016

The Best Teen Books of 2016

Kirkus Reviews magazine has just released its list of the "Best Teen Books of 2016." The list is several pages long, so we've just spotlighted a few here, but we encourage you to browse all of Kirkus' recommendations. Have you read any of these?


The Memory Book, by Lara Avery

When a rare genetic disorder steals away her memories and then her health, teenaged Sammie records notes in a journal to her future self, documenting moments great and small.





Three Dark Crowns, by Kendare Blake

In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born--three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to control storms or flames with the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, able to ingest the deadliest poisons without harm. And Arsinoe, a naturalist, can control nature. But becoming the Queen Crowned isn't solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. And it's not just a game of win or lose ... it's life or death. The night the sisters turn sixteen, the battle begins. The last queen standing gets the crown.

Merrow, by Ananda Braxton-Smith

Enduring whispers about her absent mother's alleged merrow origins after her father drowns, twelve-year-old Neen questions her identity as she becomes increasingly torn between the worlds of the sea and her island home.





 
The Reader, by Traci Chee

After her father is brutally murdered, Sefia flees into the wilderness with her aunt Nin, who teaches her to hunt, track, and steal. But when Nin is kidnapped none of her survival skills can help her discover where Nin's been taken, or if she's even alive. The only clue is the odd rectangular object her father left behind, an object she comes to realize is a book-- a marvelous item unheard of in her otherwise illiterate society. With the aid of a mysterious stranger with dark secrets of his own, Sefia sets out to rescue her aunt and find out what really happened the day her father was killed.

The Great American Whatever, by Tim Federle

Quinn Roberts' only worry used to be writing convincing dialogue for the movies he made with his sister Annabeth. Of course, that was before the car accident that changed everything. Enter Geoff, Quinn's best friend who insists its time that Quinn came out-- at least from hibernation. Geoff drags Quinn to a party where he meets a guy-- okay, a hot guy-- and falls, hard. And Quinn begins imagining his future as a screenplay that might actually have a happily-ever-after ending-- if he can finally step back into the starring role of his own life story.

The Lie Tree, by Frances Hardinge

On an island off the south coast of Victorian England, fourteen-year-old Faith investigates the mysterious death of her father, who was involved in a scandal, and discovers a tree that feeds upon lies and gives those who eat its fruit visions of truth.



 

My Sister Rosa, by Justine Larbalestier

When his father's business takes the family to New York City, a seventeen-year-old Australian boy must balance his desire to protect his ten-year-old sister, a diagnosable psychopath, from the world with the desperate need to protect the world from her.





Shame the Stars, by Guadalupe Garcia McCall

In the midst of racial conflict and at the edges of a war at the Texas-Mexico border in 1915, Joaquín and Dulceña attempt to maintain a secret romance in this reimagining of Romeo and Juliet.
Replica, by Lauren Oliver

Replica is a "flip book" that contains two narratives in one, and it is the first in a duology. Turn the book one way and read Lyra's story; turn the book over and upside down and read Gemma's story. The stories can be read separately, one after the other, or in alternating chapters. The two distinct parts of this astonishing novel combine to produce an unforgettable journey. See our 11/25 Free Fridays post for an extended summary of the book.


Scythe, by Neal Shusterman

In a world where disease has been eliminated, the only way to die is to be randomly killed ('gleaned') by professional reapers ('scythes'). Two teens must compete with each other to become a scythe--a position neither of them wants. The one who becomes a scythe must kill the one who doesn't.




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